Oblivion

This world is inexorably approaching oblivion.


Our end heralded by an age of madness.


Mass self-abandonment.


The death of the attention span.


Rampant desensitisation.


All has turned to the pursuit of attention and distraction.


Integrity, art, unconditional goodness — these things have melted away.


There is now only the gaping, all-encompassing, almighty vertical screen.


Share. Subscribe. Follow. Like. Upvote. Downvote.


Lost in the shuffle — the humanity we once had.


Generosity staged.


Wildlife abused.


Don’t help, just film.


Film it. Record it. Share it. Get likes.


Get attention.


Distract from the hell-path we’re on.


Then die.


For hundreds of years humanity lived as itself, as a race of mammals at least somewhat connected with each other and our planet.


You can’t argue that the internet and modern technology are a natural continuation of what came before — they broke what was in progress.


It broke everything.

That is why we are now all broken inside.


And we seek healing and reconnection from a world that is now fundamentally non-conductive to either.


The door has shut behind us and there’s no going back.


There’s no leaving this room we’ve locked ourselves into.


By the 2030s, any resemblance of what humanity used to be, what language used to be, what love and learning and living life used to be, will vanish completely.


Spend as much time in nature as you can,


as far away from your phone as you can,


while you can.

Because soon, everything —


besides our precious screens — will all be gone.